Care For Your Cat With These Essential Tips

Cats may be animals, but so many centuries of serving as domesticated pets has spoiled them. Cats today have become much more sensitive to the wild than the rest of the animal kingdom. Fleas, ticks, and other critters can quickly and quietly become a serious problem if your cat is outside often.

Be sure to have your pet cat spayed or neutered by the time it is six months old. A spayed or neutered cat is a more satisfactory pet because it is calmer, quieter and more likely to stay home. Neutered male cats do not spray urine to mark their territory. This is definitely a plus when it comes to cat ownership.

Make sure your cat is always well groomed. Cats must be brushed and groomed frequently. Brushing rids your cat’s coat of dirt and helps keep them clean. This will also reduce things like shedding and hairballs because it keeps them from having extra hair. Brushing your cat will keep your home cleaner, too.

A vet trip should happen for your cat yearly. Cats need yearly shots and overall health assessments. Make sure you keep the same veterinarian for your pet throughout its life. That way, the doctor will be familiar with the history of your cat.

If your cat is an outdoor cat or a cat that has a habit of getting outside, they need proper identification. The cat should have a safety collar and an ID tag. Safety collars that have elastic bands allow cats to get out of the collar if they get it caught on something. An ID tag or an implanted microchip can help your cat get returned if they’re lost.

Take your cat to the vet every year. A yearly visit for a regular check-up is important, with more frequent visits for shots as required. Make vet appointments immediately if your cat has a medical condition or has become injured.

Avoid eye contact to make friends with a cat. Ever wonder why cats seem drawn to the person who likes cats the least? The answer lies in cat body language. To cats, staring is ‘rude’ and can be considered a challenge. Looking away shows that you respect their space and are not going to be a threat. So next time you are looking to meet a new feline friend, look away and let them approach you.

Keep your cat indoors. Unlike dogs, it is nearly impossible to confine a cat to a yard. This can lead to many dangers for your cat, from cars, dogs, diseases from feral cats, and simply disappearing to parts unknown. Loose cats also be a nuisance to others, often killing songbirds and leaving unwelcome ‘deposits’ in neighbor’s gardens. If your cat really enjoys the outdoors, they can be trained to wear a harness and leash or you can invest in a specialty cat fence or screened-in porch.

The outside world doesn’t need to be a scary place for you or your cat. These tips should help keep your new pet safe from infections, poisonous wildlife, and other dangerous animals. If your cat can’t seem to escape some constant disturbance outside, it may need to spend more time indoors instead.