Cat-Care Knowledge That Will Assist All Cat Owners

Cats may be animals, but so many centuries of serving as domesticated pets has spoiled them. Cats today have become much more sensitive to the wild than the rest of the animal kingdom. Fleas, ticks, and other critters can quickly and quietly become a serious problem if your cat is outside often.

If your dog and cat are best friends, be sure to keep them separate after flea treatment. Your dog’s flea products are very hazardous for cats. Cats that come in contact with dog flea products often die. Be sure to use only cat products on your cat and only dog products on your dog.

Check your cat for ticks and fleas every week. If your cat does have fleas, there is a good chance that you also have fleas in your home. You might need some flea bombs or premise-control sprays, along with treating the cat, to get rid of the issue. If you don’t know what products to use for controlling ticks and fleas, talk to your vet for some safe options.

As your cat gets older, changes in behavior may signal pain. If your cat doesn’t like to jump or climb any more, it may be in pain. If your cat stops taking care of grooming or stops using its litter box, pain may be the cause. Be sure to have your older cat checked out by your vet if you notice behavior changes.

If you just got your cat you want to take them to the veterinarian right away, especially if it is a feral cat or kitten. Kittens are born with parasites and need shots and medication to get rid of them. Feral cats can carry diseases. This is why it is important to have them checked out immediately.

An indoor cat who gets a taste of the outdoors will forever want to go outside. If you know your cat will always be an indoor cat, do your best to keep them from sneaking out. You can try to train your cat to stay in your yard when you are outside.

Never have your cat declawed. Many people misunderstand declawing, thinking it is the simple removal of a cat’s nail. This is not true. In fact, the veterinarian must remove the top knuckle along with the claw during the procedure. This can result in arthritis pain later in life and many behavior problems, such as biting. There are many alternatives from scratching posts to glue-on claw caps that can protect your belongings from a cat’s claws without resorting to such a harsh surgical solution.

When you move your cat from one house to another, be sure to move the cat last. Set up a quiet room with familiar items for the cat. Keep your cat in the room and quiet for a day or two. Visit and feed the cat in the room. After a couple of days, the cat can explore the rest of the house.

The outside world doesn’t need to be a scary place for you or your cat. These tips should help keep your new pet safe from infections, poisonous wildlife, and other dangerous animals. If your cat can’t seem to escape some constant disturbance outside, it may need to spend more time indoors instead.